In a Village by the Sea by Muon Van

In a Village by the Sea

In a Village by the Sea

In a Village by the Sea by Muon Van and illustrated by April Chu introduces kids and adults alike to another part of the world through a simple story about a fisherman and his family who live in a small home in a village by the sea in Vietnam. The family is waiting for the fisherman, who is caught in a storm, to come home. It’s a story about family, about love, about waiting, about hope. The repetitive structure adds a lyricism and beauty to the words that perfectly complements the gorgeous illustrations.

The book is a great one to add to your library because of its beautiful illustrations and its multicultural content. But I’ll add my own two-cents which, these days, seems to be something of a political statement. If you go back and look at my posts, you’ll notice that the vast majority of books I review are published by small, independent presses. This book is no exception, published by the extraordinarily tiny one-woman press, Creston Books.

If you care about diversity in books, if you have ever tweeted or blogged or facebooked or spoken in support of #WeNeedDiverseBooks, then you need to pay more attention to small, indie presses…and you need to support them by buying their books. Indie presses are the ones who are really doing it and have been doing it for years, long before the hashtag.

From In a Village by the Sea by Muon Van

From In a Village by the Sea by Muon Van

1 comment for “In a Village by the Sea by Muon Van

  1. March 4, 2016 at 9:03 pm

    Sallie Lowenstein:Hi,There are a number of wodernful multicultural independent publishers: Cinco Puntos, Heryin Books, The Children’s Book Press, Pumpkin House (Russian books)and Exit Studio (Taino Indians of Puerto Rico). But don’t forget some classic pre-k books that are just amazing, though notnecessarily multi- cultural: Round Trip and The Trek (both by Jonas); Peek-a-Boo by the Ahlbergs; Northern Lullaby (the Dillons), Piggies (the Woods): Gobble Growl and Grunt (OP) by Peter Spier; The Grey Lady and the Strawberry Snatcher (Molly Bang): The Maggie B (Hass). Also be sure to remember nursery rhyme books. My favorite of the moment is the two volumes picked by Iona Opie (the grand lady of nursery rhymes) and illustrated by Rosemary Wells. Reading specialists will tell you that there are many problems in reading brought on by the fact that nursery rhymes are no longer read to children, and so they don’t hear the repetition of sound or get the vocab they need as small children. So in that regard, don’t forget the old Sendak Chicken Soup with Rice, One was Johnny, and Pierre. I’d also like to put a plug in to say that a good book has a universal theme that appeals to everyone. I’m both a YA and pic book author/illustrator, and I was just in Baltimore at a Pratt Library branch and talking to a group of inner city fourth graders. I read them my upcoming picture book for 4-8 and they just roared with laughter, even though it wasn’t about multicultural kids. They really loved the art and the story. And I find that’s true of other books as well. Hope this helps. There are so many more. Write back if you’d like more suggestions.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *